Comms

Kachina…

Emily Anja Kachina Schneider.

Kachina; Katcina; Katsina is a Native American spirit that may represent anything and means “spirit father, life, or spirit”. The Kachinas helped people to understand how to live off the land and how to heal sickness. Kachinas brought rain for agriculture with powerful dancing ceremonies and provided tribes with many blessings. After the Hopi (a Native American tribe) were attacked, the kachinas’ souls returned to the underworld.

From now on the Hopi started to do ceremonies impersonating the Kachinas by wearing their masks, with the aim to bring well-being to the community, and one says that the spirits who returned to the underground enter the body of the dancer. Natice Americans pray to the great spirits to get blessed with good weather and a good harvest.

There are Kachina dolls (see picture below) which were meant to teach children about spiritual beings and their wisdom. They were usually made out of wood, very colourful, and each of them was unique.

But why is ‘Kachina’ my third name?

My father has always been interested in the Native American culture. He visited many tribes and in one of them he met a man who created handmade jewellery, one of them being a bracelet made out of silver in which the outlines of a Kachina were engraved. He started to inform himself about this unique spirit and later on he even used the same design for his and my mothers wedding rings. The Kachina always had a special place in his heart and so does she in mine.

Totem. A Totem is a spiritual being, that will accompany you through life, acting as a guide.

For my 16th Birthday I received an handmade necklace from my parents. It is my ‘Totem’, a deer. The characteristics of my Totem are: Gentleness, Ability to move through life and obstacles with grace, Being in touch with your inner child, Being sensitive and intuitive, Animal of the Energy of Love and Harmony with oneself and others.

https://www.pinterest.nz/pin/182818066100044408/

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